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8A Hughes St
Potts Point, NSW, 2011

+61 0430 114 129

Skarfe is Australia's premier scarf boutique. We source & select the finest scarves from around the world, and ship to your door for free. Skarfe also offers custom digital printing services & works with talented local artists on limited edition scarf collaborations.

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Filtering by Tag: australian art

MEET OUR MATCH: ONE OF TWELVE

Brad McGlashan

There is no doubt about it, Australian organisation, One of Twelve, is our kindred spirit!  Passionate and dedicated to the art sector, they have created a range of scarves that celebrate emerging and established artists within the Asia Pacific region in a tangible way. As many of you are aware, art is at the heart of everything we do here at Skarfe — it is in every silk fibre that hangs in our store— so it seems only natural that we should welcome One of Twelve into our collection.

Working directly with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art centres, the range includes works by five artists: Margaret Baragurra, Derek O’Conner, Ham Darroch, Jimmy Donegan and Samuel Miller. Each vibrant design is realized on a silk satin square with hand-rolled hems and is accompanied with the artist’s card, detailing their background and practice. While each scarf is utterly unique, there is an intrinsic harmony that is so undeniably Australian. It is this focus, this interest in our country that makes these works so empowering.

We are so excited to have found our soul sister, or brother from another mother, in One of Twelve and hope you too will be captivated by their cultural synergy.

Shop the new One of Twelve range here

KAREN BLACK: OTHER PEOPLE'S LIVES

Brad McGlashan

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Our latest collaboration with local artist Karen Black is an ode to our home, Potts Point. With a host of eccentric personalities, from bankers and bums to dames and drag queens, Potts Point is integral to our D.N.A as it is with Karen’s.
 
Living in King’s Cross, her work ‘Licking the rain’ (2017) explores the imaginary lives of the people living in the apartment block she looks out upon. Playing out like a film, her invented cast of colourful characters comes alive on a generous swathe of cashmere modal. A rich melody of colour, shape and fabric sparks intrigue and entices us to imagine the stories that lie beneath!
 
Karen’s ability to communicate an inner human dialogue through her ambiguous shapes marries with the art of the scarf. Her Potts Point locals introduce themselves at various moments, depending on how the scarf is wrapped and draped. Working with Karen has been a symphonic relationship and one very close to our hearts.
 
‘Licking the rain’ (2017) was a finalist in this year’s Sulman Award at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

Shop Karen Black's limited edition collaboration for SKARFE here

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LEAH FRASER: ARTIST OR SORCERER?

Brad McGlashan

Image Credit: Natasha Foster for SKARFE

Image Credit: Natasha Foster for SKARFE

Sydney-based artist Leah Fraser is a modern day Scheherazade. Her lyrical paintings tell stories of shaman-like characters travelling through mystic lands in search of spiritual metamorphosis. Decorated in ritualistic clothing, her figures seem to grow from nature, exploring mans deeply intrinsic relationship to the natural world.
 
Fraser’s latest work takes us on a journey, foraging through rich thickets strewn with wild flowers and humming with birds to discover a woman, pierced by arrows and yet, ‘Her beauty was visible still’. We have translated this dream-like scene onto a luxuriously soft cashmere modal scarf. Hand-fringed, it drapes beautifully on the body, exposing different elements of the artwork each time it is tied, whether it be a floral motif, trees against a dusk sky, or the Artemis-like figure herself. Fraser, be she story-teller, witch or artist, has shrouded us in a magical scarf worthy of a shaman. 

Shop the limited edition Leah Fraser cashmere blend scarf here!
 

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#CREATINGCOLOURCHEMISTRY

Brad McGlashan

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Grace Burzese is a Sydney-based abstract painter who revels in colour. We've recently had the opportunity to digitally print three of her original artworks as silk scarves, and couldn't be more thrilled with the result. We sat down with Grace for a quick Q&A to chat about her process, and to discuss how her work translates to textiles...

Grace, your work is a beautiful exploration of colour and form and it seems to truly come alive when rendered on silk. Was it this that made you decide to collaborate with us using our custom printing services?

First off, thank you. I have really enjoyed the process of seeing how the paintings translate onto silk. For a while I had been thinking of transferring some of my artworks onto fabric as an adjunct to my practice, so when I came across Skarfe and their custom printing services, it was such a great option. The quality of printing is so rich and detailed, that it provided a foolproof way to experiment and try a new venture. It meant I didn’t have to trail around to different printers searching for the results I was after and Brad is such an easy-going and lovely person to work with.

You have mentioned that abstraction allows you to explore your sense of being. Do you feel by turning your works into scarves you are adding another dimension to your work? Perhaps allowing others to explore their own sense of self just by wearing them, or seeing the work abstracted further as it is artfully tied?

Absolutely! Yes, to all of the above. Whether one is making art or collecting it, it’s an expression of self - what we like to surround ourselves with and how we adorn ourselves and lives. The scarves act as an extension to the practice - the articulation of forms and colours in space with fabric. A couple of years ago I made some sculptures which explored the idea of a three-dimensional painting, essentially veering the painting away from only existing within a two-dimensional picture plane. Similarly, through draping and folding, the scarves act as a soft sculpture. Because the materiality of the paint and mark making is rendered so richly, your eye follows those marks as actual forms and this adds another layer when wearing the scarf as parts stand out as being quite three dimensional.

As an artist what does it mean to you to see your work not just hanging on walls but turned into something more commercial, more viable – does it change the way you approach your practice?

The work I make is process based and all about experimentation and play. I love the making aspect of it. Turning paintings into scarves is another avenue to maintain my creative practice. The scarves are essentially limited edition prints of the work, but one you can wear and play with. Being an artist and having gallery shows is wonderful, however, one of the best parts of this is when a work sells and you get to see it live through someone else. It’s always such a joy to come across your artwork in someone’s home or work environment. Making scarves allows this process to be a lot more accessible. That’s one of the reasons I created the hashtag #creatingcolourchemistry. I sincerely would love to see how people style themselves or objects around them with the scarves. And then in a way, it becomes a moving, morphing installation. I want to encourage people to bring beauty, colour and art into their lives. To have fun with it.

How would you like people to interpret your scarves? 

I’d like people to primarily interpret the scarves as utilitarian pieces of art. To enjoy them, but not be too precious with them, let them become a part of your everyday expression of self.

Check out Grace's gorgeous new scarf range here, or learn more about our custom scarf printing here

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HUSEYIN SAMI X SKARFE

Brad McGlashan

Huseyin Sami,   Untitled (PWGB)   2016, acrylic on canvas, 153 x 122cm

Huseyin Sami, Untitled (PWGB) 2016, acrylic on canvas, 153 x 122cm

Huseyin Sami’s work seems to lend itself to the art of the scarf. His unique material language of painting and his exploration of opening up a new creative space, seems harmonious with our own ideas of wearable art. Delicious Neapolitan hues of household paint seem to drape over the canvas exploring colour, form and materiality. It is this tactility that adds another element to our sizable silk twill design.

At our recent scarf-tying event in aid of Pratham AUS, it was fascinating to see how the colours and drape complemented each complexion, adding softness and style in an understated and beautiful way. The joy of owning and wearing this scarf, is that however you tie it, it will always look different — what could be more exciting than a piece that will constantly surprise?

Huseyin Sami is represented by the Sarah Cottier Gallery in Sydney, and the Sophie Shannon Gallery in Melbourne. Shop the limited edition scarf collaboration here.

MOTHER OF THE DRY TREE

Brad McGlashan

Nell,   Mother of the Dry Tree   2017, Synthetic polymer paint and mixed media on linen, wood.

Nell, Mother of the Dry Tree 2017, Synthetic polymer paint and mixed media on linen, wood.

AC/DC, the Virgin Mary and Child — a collaboration? Why not! Here at Skarfe we continue to explore the fascination and utter joy of turning a significant piece of contemporary art into something that is uniquely wearable, and more importantly attainable!

Imagine yourself swathed in the arm-like branches of artist, Nell’s ‘Mother of the Dry Tree’ painting, hung at Sydney’s Museum of Contemporary Art, as part of The National: 2017. Rendered upon a luxuriously soft and lightweight cashmere and modal blend, this oversized piece is both haunting and seductive.  Fusing religious iconography with a rock ‘n’ roll aesthetic, our scarf exemplifies the way in which material and image combine to create its own distinctive art form. Nell’s work literally speaks for itself- with its wailing ovoid shapes that could possibly be singing a rendition of ‘Highway to Hell’. Now isn’t that an interesting thought?!

Nell is represented by Roslyn Oxley9. Shop the limited edition Nell collaboration here.