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8A Hughes St
Potts Point, NSW, 2011

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Skarfe is Australia's premier scarf boutique. We source & select the finest scarves from around the world, and ship to your door for free. Skarfe also offers custom digital printing services & works with talented local artists on limited edition scarf collaborations.

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Filtering by Tag: custom scarf printing

INTRODUCING: WALMSLEY & COLE

Brad McGlashan

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Hickory Dickory Dock,

Walmsley & Cole scarves are in stock,

Full of whimsical fun,

The silk show has begun!

Hickory Dickory Dock.

Excuse our little ditty but it’s the first thing that comes to mind when ogling New Zealand based label, Walmsley & Cole’s charming silken wares! Reading like storybooks, their squares and twillies are decorated with blue-stockinged crossed legs; moon travelling snails; and freshly manicured green hands plucking sweet wild strawberries. 

Surreal worlds of escape, these scarves are designed, or should we say conjured, by husband and wife team, Faith Walmsley and Nick Cole. With a rich background in graphic and textile design, Faith yields her paintbrush like a wand, creating whimsical motifs that delight and beguile. Using our custom printing service, we acted as Sorcerer’s apprentice to help transform them into scarves. Awash with pastel tones and quirky patterns, Walmsley & Cole’s first chapter marks a dazzling debut and has us yearning for the next adventure.

Shop the first drop of their new range here.

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PAINT BY COLOUR

Brad McGlashan

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There can be no denying the magic of colour. We each experience it in a completely different way, its spectral hues making an impression. The Art Gallery of South Australia charts the revolution of colour through the art of the Impressionists with their new exhibition, Colours of Impressionism. With 65 masterpieces exclusively on display from the Musée d’Orsay, one can revel in Monet’s emerald greens, Renoir’s blush pinks and Manet’s dramatic tones.

As part of the exhibition’s gallery shop we have rendered our own cashmere scarves in hues reflective of The Masters palette. From forest green and cornflower blue to rosy pink and lavender, our scarves move like the brushstrokes of Pissaro.

We also collaborated with the Gallery to turn Paul Signac’s Les Andelys (1886) painting into a silk chiffon scarf for the exhibition. Back in 1886 when the painting was first exhibited, critic Gustave Kahn noted that the piece was ‘deeply infused with the joy of things and illustrated with the magical effects of light.’ (La Vie moderne, 9 April 1887). The same can be said of its transformation into a scarf. We chose to render the work onto silk chiffon to enhance the iridescent quality of the work, as the water seems to ripple with movement and the greenery rustles as the wind blows through. The dappled brushstrokes and muted palette of green, greyish blue and biscuit neutrals meld into a luminous pattern when draped around the neck, drawing focus to the colours themselves. 

This is a stunning exhibition that cannot be missed, especially when you can take home a piece from the Musée d’Orsay— in scarf form of course! Colours of Impresssionism runs from March 29 to July 29 2018. Purchase your tickets here

For more information on Skarfe's custom printing, email info@skarfe.com

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IN FULL BLOOM

Brad McGlashan

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There is nothing more beautiful than a rose. From its initial stages as a teardrop bud to the unfurling of its velvety petals — it is beauty in its purest form. Melbourne photographer, Fabrice Bigot, has captured the rose’s ephemeral majesty in his latest exhibition ‘BLOOM’ at MARS gallery. Held in honor of International Women’s Day, the exhibit reads as an ode to women, with each rose acting as a symbol of individuality and haunting beauty.

Bigot transports the viewer to the early morning hours in various Victorian gardens, drawing the flower into focus with his play on light and heightened colour. One can almost taste the fresh morning dew, touch the rose’s silky petals and smell its sweet scent. Bigot’s work allows us to experience a moment in time that is both familiar and meditative, and therein lies the artist’s power.

As part of the exhibition we transformed Bigot’s work ‘Flores Venerae #7’ into a pure silk chiffon scarf. Limited to just 50 pieces, a percentage from the sale of the scarves will be donated to Global Fund for Women to support anti-violence programs around the world. Available at both MARS Gallery and The Store, this is a scarf that celebrates the beauty of being a woman— thorns and all.

For more information on Skarfe's custom printing services, email info@skarfe.com

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INTRODUCING: FRANKIE PEACH

Brad McGlashan

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New scarf label Frankie Peach is, quite frankly, just peachy! Much like the fruit itself, the scarves are sweet, fresh and utterly modern.

Founded by friends Sali Sasi and Charlotta Backlund, the duo boast impressive experience within the fashion industry— Sasi cofounded Stylerunner and Backlund has 10 years of styling experience, which recently included being fashion director of Cosmopolitan. It is this synergy that makes their scarves not only irresistible but clever and considered, as they offer everything from silk twillies and squares to generous cashmere pashminas.

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With a little help from our custom printing services, each scarf is patterned with beautiful folkish hand-painted wild flowers, Cocteau-esque figures, stripes, spots and big beautiful blooms that seem to go ‘Bang! Bang!’. You can’t help but note the succulent little peach that accents each scarf and their clever titles, including ‘Bare It All’ for the naked dames and ‘In Plain Sight’ for the simple cashmere wrap.

Now we could stop there and let these delectable pieces speak for themselves, but how could we when they themselves speak for so much more? $1 from every Frankie Peach sale goes towards Pink Hope, a charity that empowers women to understand and reduce their risk of breast and ovarian cancer. What better reason is there to take a big juicy bite of this new label.

Shop the Frankie Peach scarf designs here or to learn more about Skarfe's custom scarf printing services email us at info@skarfe.com 

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#CREATINGCOLOURCHEMISTRY

Brad McGlashan

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Grace Burzese is a Sydney-based abstract painter who revels in colour. We've recently had the opportunity to digitally print three of her original artworks as silk scarves, and couldn't be more thrilled with the result. We sat down with Grace for a quick Q&A to chat about her process, and to discuss how her work translates to textiles...

Grace, your work is a beautiful exploration of colour and form and it seems to truly come alive when rendered on silk. Was it this that made you decide to collaborate with us using our custom printing services?

First off, thank you. I have really enjoyed the process of seeing how the paintings translate onto silk. For a while I had been thinking of transferring some of my artworks onto fabric as an adjunct to my practice, so when I came across Skarfe and their custom printing services, it was such a great option. The quality of printing is so rich and detailed, that it provided a foolproof way to experiment and try a new venture. It meant I didn’t have to trail around to different printers searching for the results I was after and Brad is such an easy-going and lovely person to work with.

You have mentioned that abstraction allows you to explore your sense of being. Do you feel by turning your works into scarves you are adding another dimension to your work? Perhaps allowing others to explore their own sense of self just by wearing them, or seeing the work abstracted further as it is artfully tied?

Absolutely! Yes, to all of the above. Whether one is making art or collecting it, it’s an expression of self - what we like to surround ourselves with and how we adorn ourselves and lives. The scarves act as an extension to the practice - the articulation of forms and colours in space with fabric. A couple of years ago I made some sculptures which explored the idea of a three-dimensional painting, essentially veering the painting away from only existing within a two-dimensional picture plane. Similarly, through draping and folding, the scarves act as a soft sculpture. Because the materiality of the paint and mark making is rendered so richly, your eye follows those marks as actual forms and this adds another layer when wearing the scarf as parts stand out as being quite three dimensional.

As an artist what does it mean to you to see your work not just hanging on walls but turned into something more commercial, more viable – does it change the way you approach your practice?

The work I make is process based and all about experimentation and play. I love the making aspect of it. Turning paintings into scarves is another avenue to maintain my creative practice. The scarves are essentially limited edition prints of the work, but one you can wear and play with. Being an artist and having gallery shows is wonderful, however, one of the best parts of this is when a work sells and you get to see it live through someone else. It’s always such a joy to come across your artwork in someone’s home or work environment. Making scarves allows this process to be a lot more accessible. That’s one of the reasons I created the hashtag #creatingcolourchemistry. I sincerely would love to see how people style themselves or objects around them with the scarves. And then in a way, it becomes a moving, morphing installation. I want to encourage people to bring beauty, colour and art into their lives. To have fun with it.

How would you like people to interpret your scarves? 

I’d like people to primarily interpret the scarves as utilitarian pieces of art. To enjoy them, but not be too precious with them, let them become a part of your everyday expression of self.

Check out Grace's gorgeous new scarf range here, or learn more about our custom scarf printing here

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CUSTOM SCARF PRINTING: LAUREN WEBSTER

Brad McGlashan

Lauren Webster is a Sydney-based artist and creative, known as Lauren & The Lost Boys. Her graphic work has lent itself to a number of collaborations, with fashion labels, surfboard and skateboard brands, photographers, object designers, jewellers, interior decorators, magazines and events.

Lauren recently reached out to us to ask about turning one of her amazing designs into a silk scarf. And we couldn't be more pleased with the result! 

Lauren's 'Protea Impala' started out as an original ink on paper artwork, and at skarfe we've digitally printed the design to a luxurious silk twill with hand-rolled hems. Definitely one of the coolest neck-scarves we've made to date! 

Lauren's instagram is a constant source of inspiration or shop the scarf on her online store. For more information about skarfe's custom printing read about it over here, or just drop us a line at info@skarfe.com We're happy to chat! 

CUSTOM SCARF PRINTING: TATSUO MIYAJIMA AT THE MCA

Brad McGlashan

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We recently worked with Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) on a custom scarf design to accompany their major Summer exhibition, Tatsuo Miyajima: Connect With Everything.

Tatsuo Miyajima (born 1957, Ibaraki) is one of Japan’s most renowned contemporary artists, known for his sculptures and room-scale installations incorporating light and numbers. Tatsuo Miyajima: Connect With Everything is Miyajima’s first exhibition in the Southern Hemisphere. It encompasses his sculptural works, rooms and environments, and performance videos.

Time and its passage are explored through the works and represented visually by multiple, small digital counting devices. Miyajima developed his first customised digital counters in the late 1980s, using light emitting diodes or LEDs. These ‘counter gadgets’ remain central to his art today, their red and green palette expanding in the mid-1990s to include blue, then white, as LED technology developed in and beyond Japan.

The scarf features a detail of Warp Time with Warp Self (2010), a work which bathes viewers in immersive coloured light and mirrored finishes. The scarf is printed to 100% silk chiffon, with hand-rolled hems and is available exclusively from the Museum of Contemporary Art gift store for the duration of the exhibition (03 November 16 - 5 March 2017).

Plan your trip and buy tickets to the MCA exhibition here or to enquire about our custom digital scarf printing, contact Skarfe via email at info@skarfe.com

CUSTOM SCARF PRINTING: VICTORIA SMYTH

Brad McGlashan

Victoria Smyth is a Potts Point local, whose many talents include nature photography. Victoria and her two gorgeous labradoodles were regular visitors at skarfe, then when we discovered her photography, we encouraged her to transform them into beautiful scarves! 

Having taken photographs in Aspen, Colorado, what inspired you to want to translate these onto scarves? Where did the idea stem from?

The photographs I took of bark from the Aspen tree were really taken out of curiosity.  The marks on the trunks were so expressive that I wanted to record them.  It was only when I saw the enlarged image that I saw how beautiful they were up close and so I wanted to do something with the images.  Scarves have long been an enjoyment of mine so the idea came quite naturally.

Your work started whilst on holiday in Aspen. However, your brand now also exemplifies the beauty of nature in Australia. When you photograph in Sydney, which suburbs attract you the most? And although your scarves are all quite distinct, they are all linked through your choice of subdued, natural colours. What attracts you to this tonal palette over more striking, vivid colours?

I photograph wherever I happen to be. It is almost an obsession now I’m afraid - even my friends are taking photos for me on their holidays and recommending places to visit.  Yes, my palette is quite subdued at the moment but that is largely the result of the nature of the bark.  In my next collection I will have some very beautiful and strong coloured scarves from photographs taken last summer in Sydney - the bark changes dramatically depending on the time of the year and some of the new bark is spectacular. 

Have you ever been formally trained in the arts or as a photographer?

I trained as an architect and then much, much later as a colour consultant.  I have worked in design and architectural heritage too but have always dabbled in design and colour. This latest project is a bit new as I have had to learn a bit about business!

Shop the beautiful Victoria Smyth range here! And find out more about skarfe's custom scarf printing here, or drop us a line at info@skarfe.com