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8A Hughes St
Potts Point, NSW, 2011

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Skarfe is Australia's premier scarf boutique. We source & select the finest scarves from around the world, and ship to your door for free. Skarfe also offers custom digital printing services & works with talented local artists on limited edition scarf collaborations.

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Filtering by Category: Custom Printing

UP UP & AWAY: THE LIBERTINE COLLECTION

Brad McGlashan

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Soaring thirty thousand feet about the earth, The Libertine Collections’ gravity-defying scarves take us to new heights. With names like ‘Cloud Baby’, ‘Plane Halo’ and ‘Australian Doodle’, they capture the natural patterns of the earth and sky, offering us a view we might never bare witness to. From this heavenly aspect, landing at Heathrow Airport suddenly becomes an experience of saintly light. The London Array, the world’s largest offshore wind farm, transforms into a flock of white birdlike motifs set upon a navy blue gradation.

Custom printed by Skarfe on premium quality silk habotai, each scarf evokes the mystery and ethereal beauty of our planet. A mercurial fluidity of colour and pattern, they prove that the earth is its own artistic master, especially when viewed from outside ourselves. The Libertine Collection offers us a chance to take flight. However you drape these scarves around your neck, consider them your very own sartorial wings.

Shop the heavenly range here.

libertine collection silk scarf

IT'S A WHITELEY!

Brad McGlashan

Whiteley. The name says it all. In a mere two syllables an anthology of Australian artistic icons was born. Brett Whiteley is undoubtedly one of our most celebrated and revered artists. His impact on our culture is profound and continues to resonate long after his death.

The NGV’s latest exhibition, ‘Baldessin/Whiteley: Parallel Visions’, draws comparisons with fellow Australian artist, George Baldessin. The exhibit explores the artists’ work in the context of what it is to be human in an urban environment at a time of tension, while also celebrating the human spirit.

To hallmark the exhibition we custom printed Whiteley’s 1975 work, ‘Evening coming in on Sydney Harbour’, onto diaphanous silk chiffon with hand-rolled hems. Sydney harbour’s inky waters ripple and swell upon its generous size, with glimpses of the Harbour Bridge appearing every now and then in Whiteley’s characteristic brushstrokes. Like his art, this scarf has longevity.

Subtle nuances in colour and subject make it perfect for both day and night. We can only imagine the sense of pride one must feel to hang a Whiteley, but to wear one? Just think of the thrill when people ask: “Whose scarf is that?”, to which you respond: “It’s a Whiteley!”

For more info on Skarfe’s custom printing services email info@skarfe.com or if you’d like a Whiteley scarf of your own, contact the NGV Store.

Brett Whiteley silk chiffon scarf by SKARFE for the NGV.

Brett Whiteley silk chiffon scarf by SKARFE for the NGV.

TAKING FLIGHT WITH THE SCOTT SISTERS

Brad McGlashan

Scott Sister Specimen Drawing silk scarf in blue for the Australian Museum

Scott Sister Specimen Drawing silk scarf in blue for the Australian Museum

After a recent trip to Sydney Contemporary Art Fair it is plain to see botanical prints are having a moment. We saw birds with decapitated heads highlighted in fluro by artist Joan Ross, native flowers printed and layered on glass displaying the colour spectrum, and Damian Hirst’s famous foil printed butterflies. Call it collective consciousness, but with all these botanical references in bloom, the timing is rather apt for the Museum of Australia to release their Scott Sisters scarf, designed and printed exclusively by us.

Who are the Scott Sisters?

Helena and Harriet were two of 19th Century Australia’s first professional female natural history illustrators. Born to Harriet Calcott and wealthy entomologist, grazier and entrepreneur, Alexander Walter Scott, they mixed in a liberal-minded community who encouraged women in their ideas.

Schooled by their father in the techniques of natural history illustration and scientific observing and collecting, they helped compile his book Australian Lepidoptera and their Transformations. While only 21 of the 100 paintings were published, it is plain to see the sisters’ talent to capture the minute intricacies of nature through their use of colour, texture and detail.

When we were presented with the sisters botanical plates and asked to turn them into a scarf, we jumped at the chance. The vivid colours and patterns of the butterflies wings and native flowers come alive on a swathe of chiffon, while the black and blue backgrounds make them seem like they are taking flight. Paying tribute to the Scott Sisters skills as artists and scientific observers has been a true honor and we hope they would approve of our interpretation.

For more information about the scarf, contact the Australian Museum store or to learn more about Skarfe’s custom scarf printing, send us an email at info@skarfe.com

Scott Sisters Specimen silk scarf in black for the Australian Museum

Scott Sisters Specimen silk scarf in black for the Australian Museum

PAINT BY COLOUR

Brad McGlashan

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There can be no denying the magic of colour. We each experience it in a completely different way, its spectral hues making an impression. The Art Gallery of South Australia charts the revolution of colour through the art of the Impressionists with their new exhibition, Colours of Impressionism. With 65 masterpieces exclusively on display from the Musée d’Orsay, one can revel in Monet’s emerald greens, Renoir’s blush pinks and Manet’s dramatic tones.

As part of the exhibition’s gallery shop we have rendered our own cashmere scarves in hues reflective of The Masters palette. From forest green and cornflower blue to rosy pink and lavender, our scarves move like the brushstrokes of Pissaro.

We also collaborated with the Gallery to turn Paul Signac’s Les Andelys (1886) painting into a silk chiffon scarf for the exhibition. Back in 1886 when the painting was first exhibited, critic Gustave Kahn noted that the piece was ‘deeply infused with the joy of things and illustrated with the magical effects of light.’ (La Vie moderne, 9 April 1887). The same can be said of its transformation into a scarf. We chose to render the work onto silk chiffon to enhance the iridescent quality of the work, as the water seems to ripple with movement and the greenery rustles as the wind blows through. The dappled brushstrokes and muted palette of green, greyish blue and biscuit neutrals meld into a luminous pattern when draped around the neck, drawing focus to the colours themselves. 

This is a stunning exhibition that cannot be missed, especially when you can take home a piece from the Musée d’Orsay— in scarf form of course! Colours of Impresssionism runs from March 29 to July 29 2018. Purchase your tickets here

For more information on Skarfe's custom printing, email info@skarfe.com

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IN FULL BLOOM

Brad McGlashan

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There is nothing more beautiful than a rose. From its initial stages as a teardrop bud to the unfurling of its velvety petals — it is beauty in its purest form. Melbourne photographer, Fabrice Bigot, has captured the rose’s ephemeral majesty in his latest exhibition ‘BLOOM’ at MARS gallery. Held in honor of International Women’s Day, the exhibit reads as an ode to women, with each rose acting as a symbol of individuality and haunting beauty.

Bigot transports the viewer to the early morning hours in various Victorian gardens, drawing the flower into focus with his play on light and heightened colour. One can almost taste the fresh morning dew, touch the rose’s silky petals and smell its sweet scent. Bigot’s work allows us to experience a moment in time that is both familiar and meditative, and therein lies the artist’s power.

As part of the exhibition we transformed Bigot’s work ‘Flores Venerae #7’ into a pure silk chiffon scarf. Limited to just 50 pieces, a percentage from the sale of the scarves will be donated to Global Fund for Women to support anti-violence programs around the world. Available at both MARS Gallery and The Store, this is a scarf that celebrates the beauty of being a woman— thorns and all.

For more information on Skarfe's custom printing services, email info@skarfe.com

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#CREATINGCOLOURCHEMISTRY

Brad McGlashan

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Grace Burzese is a Sydney-based abstract painter who revels in colour. We've recently had the opportunity to digitally print three of her original artworks as silk scarves, and couldn't be more thrilled with the result. We sat down with Grace for a quick Q&A to chat about her process, and to discuss how her work translates to textiles...

Grace, your work is a beautiful exploration of colour and form and it seems to truly come alive when rendered on silk. Was it this that made you decide to collaborate with us using our custom printing services?

First off, thank you. I have really enjoyed the process of seeing how the paintings translate onto silk. For a while I had been thinking of transferring some of my artworks onto fabric as an adjunct to my practice, so when I came across Skarfe and their custom printing services, it was such a great option. The quality of printing is so rich and detailed, that it provided a foolproof way to experiment and try a new venture. It meant I didn’t have to trail around to different printers searching for the results I was after and Brad is such an easy-going and lovely person to work with.

You have mentioned that abstraction allows you to explore your sense of being. Do you feel by turning your works into scarves you are adding another dimension to your work? Perhaps allowing others to explore their own sense of self just by wearing them, or seeing the work abstracted further as it is artfully tied?

Absolutely! Yes, to all of the above. Whether one is making art or collecting it, it’s an expression of self - what we like to surround ourselves with and how we adorn ourselves and lives. The scarves act as an extension to the practice - the articulation of forms and colours in space with fabric. A couple of years ago I made some sculptures which explored the idea of a three-dimensional painting, essentially veering the painting away from only existing within a two-dimensional picture plane. Similarly, through draping and folding, the scarves act as a soft sculpture. Because the materiality of the paint and mark making is rendered so richly, your eye follows those marks as actual forms and this adds another layer when wearing the scarf as parts stand out as being quite three dimensional.

As an artist what does it mean to you to see your work not just hanging on walls but turned into something more commercial, more viable – does it change the way you approach your practice?

The work I make is process based and all about experimentation and play. I love the making aspect of it. Turning paintings into scarves is another avenue to maintain my creative practice. The scarves are essentially limited edition prints of the work, but one you can wear and play with. Being an artist and having gallery shows is wonderful, however, one of the best parts of this is when a work sells and you get to see it live through someone else. It’s always such a joy to come across your artwork in someone’s home or work environment. Making scarves allows this process to be a lot more accessible. That’s one of the reasons I created the hashtag #creatingcolourchemistry. I sincerely would love to see how people style themselves or objects around them with the scarves. And then in a way, it becomes a moving, morphing installation. I want to encourage people to bring beauty, colour and art into their lives. To have fun with it.

How would you like people to interpret your scarves? 

I’d like people to primarily interpret the scarves as utilitarian pieces of art. To enjoy them, but not be too precious with them, let them become a part of your everyday expression of self.

Check out Grace's gorgeous new scarf range here, or learn more about our custom scarf printing here

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